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EA: The Human Story [Nov. 10th, 2004|12:01 am]
ea_spouse
My significant other works for Electronic Arts, and I'm what you might call a disgruntled spouse.

EA's bright and shiny new corporate trademark is "Challenge Everything." Where this applies is not exactly clear. Churning out one licensed football game after another doesn't sound like challenging much of anything to me; it sounds like a money farm. To any EA executive that happens to read this, I have a good challenge for you: how about safe and sane labor practices for the people on whose backs you walk for your millions?

I am retaining some anonymity here because I have no illusions about what the consequences would be for my family if I was explicit. However, I also feel no impetus to shy away from sharing our story, because I know that it is too common to stick out among those of the thousands of engineers, artists, and designers that EA employs.

Our adventures with Electronic Arts began less than a year ago. The small game studio that my partner worked for collapsed as a result of foul play on the part of a big publisher -- another common story. Electronic Arts offered a job, the salary was right and the benefits were good, so my SO took it. I remember that they asked him in one of the interviews: "how do you feel about working long hours?" It's just a part of the game industry -- few studios can avoid a crunch as deadlines loom, so we thought nothing of it. When asked for specifics about what "working long hours" meant, the interviewers coughed and glossed on to the next question; now we know why.

Within weeks production had accelerated into a 'mild' crunch: eight hours six days a week. Not bad. Months remained until any real crunch would start, and the team was told that this "pre-crunch" was to prevent a big crunch toward the end; at this point any other need for a crunch seemed unlikely, as the project was dead on schedule. I don't know how many of the developers bought EA's explanation for the extended hours; we were new and naive so we did. The producers even set a deadline; they gave a specific date for the end of the crunch, which was still months away from the title's shipping date, so it seemed safe. That date came and went. And went, and went. When the next news came it was not about a reprieve; it was another acceleration: twelve hours six days a week, 9am to 10pm.

Weeks passed. Again the producers had given a termination date on this crunch that again they failed. Throughout this period the project remained on schedule. The long hours started to take its toll on the team; people grew irritable and some started to get ill. People dropped out in droves for a couple of days at a time, but then the team seemed to reach equilibrium again and they plowed ahead. The managers stopped even talking about a day when the hours would go back to normal.

Now, it seems, is the "real" crunch, the one that the producers of this title so wisely prepared their team for by running them into the ground ahead of time. The current mandatory hours are 9am to 10pm -- seven days a week -- with the occasional Saturday evening off for good behavior (at 6:30pm). This averages out to an eighty-five hour work week. Complaints that these once more extended hours combined with the team's existing fatigue would result in a greater number of mistakes made and an even greater amount of wasted energy were ignored.

The stress is taking its toll. After a certain number of hours spent working the eyes start to lose focus; after a certain number of weeks with only one day off fatigue starts to accrue and accumulate exponentially. There is a reason why there are two days in a weekend -- bad things happen to one's physical, emotional, and mental health if these days are cut short. The team is rapidly beginning to introduce as many flaws as they are removing.

And the kicker: for the honor of this treatment EA salaried employees receive a) no overtime; b) no compensation time! ('comp' time is the equalization of time off for overtime -- any hours spent during a crunch accrue into days off after the product has shipped); c) no additional sick or vacation leave. The time just goes away. Additionally, EA recently announced that, although in the past they have offered essentially a type of comp time in the form of a few weeks off at the end of a project, they no longer wish to do this, and employees shouldn't expect it. Further, since the production of various games is scattered, there was a concern on the part of the employees that developers would leave one crunch only to join another. EA's response was that they would attempt to minimize this, but would make no guarantees. This is unthinkable; they are pushing the team to individual physical health limits, and literally giving them nothing for it. Comp time is a staple in this industry, but EA as a corporation wishes to "minimize" this reprieve. One would think that the proper way to minimize comp time is to avoid crunch, but this brutal crunch has been on for months, and nary a whisper about any compensation leave, nor indeed of any end of this treatment.

This crunch also differs from crunch time in a smaller studio in that it was not an emergency effort to save a project from failure. Every step of the way, the project remained on schedule. Crunching neither accelerated this nor slowed it down; its effect on the actual product was not measurable. The extended hours were deliberate and planned; the management knew what they were doing as they did it. The love of my life comes home late at night complaining of a headache that will not go away and a chronically upset stomach, and my happy supportive smile is running out.

No one works in the game industry unless they love what they do. No one on that team is interested in producing an inferior product. My heart bleeds for this team precisely BECAUSE they are brilliant, talented individuals out to create something great. They are and were more than willing to work hard for the success of the title. But that good will has only been met with abuse. Amazingly, Electronic Arts was listed #91 on Fortune magazine's "100 Best Companies to Work For" in 2003.

EA's attitude toward this -- which is actually a part of company policy, it now appears -- has been (in an anonymous quotation that I've heard repeated by multiple managers), "If they don't like it, they can work someplace else." Put up or shut up and leave: this is the core of EA's Human Resources policy. The concept of ethics or compassion or even intelligence with regard to getting the most out of one's workforce never enters the equation: if they don't want to sacrifice their lives and their health and their talent so that a multibillion dollar corporation can continue its Godzilla-stomp through the game industry, they can work someplace else.

But can they?

The EA Mambo, paired with other giants such as Vivendi, Sony, and Microsoft, is rapidly either crushing or absorbing the vast majority of the business in game development. A few standalone studios that made their fortunes in previous eras -- Blizzard, Bioware, and Id come to mind -- manage to still survive, but 2004 saw the collapse of dozens of small game studios, no longer able to acquire contracts in the face of rapid and massive consolidation of game publishing companies. This is an epidemic hardly unfamiliar to anyone working in the industry. Though, of course, it is always the option of talent to go outside the industry, perhaps venturing into the booming commercial software development arena. (Read my tired attempt at sarcasm.)

To put some of this in perspective, I myself consider some figures. If EA truly believes that it needs to push its employees this hard -- I actually believe that they don't, and that it is a skewed operations perspective alone that results in the severity of their crunching, coupled with a certain expected amount of the inefficiency involved in running an enterprise as large as theirs -- the solution therefore should be to hire more engineers, or artists, or designers, as the case may be. Never should it be an option to punish one's workforce with ninety hour weeks; in any other industry the company in question would find itself sued out of business so fast its stock wouldn't even have time to tank. In its first weekend, Madden 2005 grossed $65 million. EA's annual revenue is approximately $2.5 billion. This company is not strapped for cash; their labor practices are inexcusable.

The interesting thing about this is an assumption that most of the employees seem to be operating under. Whenever the subject of hours come up, inevitably, it seems, someone mentions 'exemption'. They refer to a California law that supposedly exempts businesses from having to pay overtime to certain 'specialty' employees, including software programmers. This is Senate Bill 88. However, Senate Bill 88 specifically does not apply to the entertainment industry -- television, motion picture, and theater industries are specifically mentioned. Further, even in software, there is a pay minimum on the exemption: those exempt must be paid at least $90,000 annually. I can assure you that the majority of EA employees are in fact not in this pay bracket; ergo, these practices are not only unethical, they are illegal.

I look at our situation and I ask 'us': why do you stay? And the answer is that in all likelihood we won't; and in all likelihood if we had known that this would be the result of working for EA, we would have stayed far away in the first place. But all along the way there were deceptions, there were promises, there were assurances -- there was a big fancy office building with an expensive fish tank -- all of which in the end look like an elaborate scheme to keep a crop of employees on the project just long enough to get it shipped. And then if they need to, they hire in a new batch, fresh and ready to hear more promises that will not be kept; EA's turnover rate in engineering is approximately 50%. This is how EA works. So now we know, now we can move on, right? That seems to be what happens to everyone else. But it's not enough. Because in the end, regardless of what happens with our particular situation, this kind of "business" isn't right, and people need to know about it, which is why I write this today.

If I could get EA CEO Larry Probst on the phone, there are a few things I would ask him. "What's your salary?" would be merely a point of curiosity. The main thing I want to know is, Larry: you do realize what you're doing to your people, right? And you do realize that they ARE people, with physical limits, emotional lives, and families, right? Voices and talents and senses of humor and all that? That when you keep our husbands and wives and children in the office for ninety hours a week, sending them home exhausted and numb and frustrated with their lives, it's not just them you're hurting, but everyone around them, everyone who loves them? When you make your profit calculations and your cost analyses, you know that a great measure of that cost is being paid in raw human dignity, right?

Right?


===

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From: (Anonymous)
2004-11-16 09:14 pm (UTC)

Re: Current Ringling Artist.. EA came to us!

Wow. It was extremely selfish and irresponsible of you to comment as you did. You are welcome to your own opinions, but there was no need to drag Ringling and your fellow classmates into this. If you don't want to work there, fine. But you DO NOT represent the vast majority of animation students here. You can only speak for yourself. I don't feel the same way you do. So don't presume to speak for me.

I'm wondering where you're getting your information, because I've also spoken with the animation interns from last year and they enjoyed it. I also know several alumni who are employed at EA and are very happy there.


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[User Picture]From: spankusmaximus
2004-11-17 04:20 pm (UTC)

Re: Current Ringling Artist.. EA came to us!

Hello, EA Top Echelon Employee...
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
From: (Anonymous)
2004-11-16 09:14 pm (UTC)
Wow. I work in adult entertainment film production and after reading all this, the execs in my industry are practically compassionate humanitarians compared to your execs! I love the irony! I'll work for Larry Flynt before I work for Larry Probst any day.
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From: (Anonymous)
2004-11-18 08:02 am (UTC)
Is he hiring??
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From: (Anonymous)
2004-11-16 09:34 pm (UTC)

This is why american programmers are outsourced.

Enough said. Too many americans believe that they are oppressed because they have to work hard. In reality they do not know what oppression is. This person can quit their job, work for someone else, or suck the govt tit i.e. welfare. Oppression is not having options.
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From: (Anonymous)
2004-11-16 09:55 pm (UTC)

Ignorance is bliss isn't it?

The reason why things are outsourced has to do with economics, and that's it. Is it cheaper to do something somewhere else? Great!

Why are things cheaper elsewhere? Any myriad reasons. Illegal labor practices, no legal recourse, much cheaper cost of living, etc, etc.

Do you really think a programmer living in America, making as little as a programmer living in a country with a much cheaper cost of living can have the same quality of life?

Get real.
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(Deleted comment)
From: (Anonymous)
2004-11-17 04:08 am (UTC)

WHY DON'T YOU DO IT!

Oh yes, you're yellow belly.
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From: (Anonymous)
2004-11-16 10:42 pm (UTC)

Something positive that YOU can do.

Here is something positive that you - yes, you, the person who is reading this comment - can do.

There are many independent game-developers around the world who release games they have written for free. Why? Because they love it! Often, they just release them on the Internet so they can share them with everyone else. They may ask for money or gifts, but they don't expect anything.

What you should do is find some of these games and play them yourself. If you like one, send a donation to the authors. They will really appreciate it, and this will encourage them to do more of the same. Even sending a nice e-mail to them will really brighten up their day. If enough people do this, these independent developers can make a living for themselves and dedicate all their time to doing something that they love. One place where you can find such games is on the Sourceforge games and entertainment section (http://sourceforge.net/softwaremap/trove_list.php?form_cat=80) (beware, many of these games are unfinished). Another place is on Allegro.cc (http://www.allegro.cc/) . I'm sure there are many more such sites on the Internet that offer free games, so if you want to mention one, please follow up to this comment..

With enough people downloading these games, everyone will realize what a game is all about, and will eventually stop buying the soul-less crap churned out by the zombified staff of the mega-corps.

Will the managers of EA suddenly become enlightened? Will a union form that will overthrow the management? That is something most of us have no control over. Will independent game developers rise from the ocean of commercial games? This is something we can all participate in. Download some games today, play them, and let the authors know you like them. If they get enough gifts, they will be inspired to make some more.

Let's bring game-development back into the hands of the game developers.

Let's make games fun again!!!

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From: bwingb
2004-11-16 11:11 pm (UTC)

Re: Something positive that YOU can do.

Ask me if I'd like to see people put their money where theur mouth is..."YEAH!!"
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From: (Anonymous)
2004-11-16 10:49 pm (UTC)

Here's an idea.

What people need to do is to make EA management notice that they are unsatisfied with the current situation and that the employees are willing to do SOMETHING about it.

How about all EA employees organize a massive break. What would be the reaction if ALL dev teams employees will take a break at exactly 4PM on FRIDAY NOVEMBER 19th. I'm sure that the management will notice that all the employees are all of a sudden gone for 10 minutes and are all just standing in the parking lot.

If you are for it, post a reply.
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From: (Anonymous)
2004-11-17 09:33 am (UTC)

Re: Here's an idea.

I'm down, we should do it at EARS! We should do it at 2pm, that is more in the middle of the day.
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[User Picture]From: antimuffin
2004-11-16 10:56 pm (UTC)

To every moron who comes here and says "stop complaining"

If you're one of the many idiots who has skimmed this article, ignored most of the comments and then posted some ridiculous comment along the lines of "Stop complaining, it could be worse, you could be in situation X," then this post is directed at you.

Just because someone else is in a worse situation than you are doesn't mean your situation isn't bad. Just because worse things could happen to you doesn't mean you shouldn't speak up.

Should victims of theft let the crime go unreported because somewhere out there, someone is getting shot? Should someone who lost an arm due to a medical mistake not complain to the hospital because somewhere out there, someone has *died* due to a medical mistake?

Should someone who is the victim of illegal practices by an employer not speak out just because somewhere out there, someone else is getting screwed over even more?

It doesn't make any sense. None. NONE AT ALL. Not in this situation, not in ANY situation. You are *extraordinarily* unlikely to be the most miserable, most suffering, most anguished, most unfairly treated person on the planet at any given time. There will ALWAYS be someone whose suffering exceeds your own. Does that mean nothing bad ever happens to you? That no injustice ever enters your life?

Things can be bad without being the ABSOLUTE WORST. In fact, they can be pretty DAMN bad. So pointing out that "things could be worse" is a job for Captain Obvious, not something that needs to be said to people who are suffering. OF COURSE things could be worse, jackass. But that doesn't mean that they aren't bad, and it CERTAINLY doesn't mean you shouldn't talk about them and try to make them better.

And to the morons of the slightly different variety who claim the people involved should "stop whining and just quit," you, too, are jackasses. Quitting solves your own personal problem, assuming you're even in a financially secure enough position to be able to do so. But what about everyone else? What about the poor sap who takes your place? Talking about how shitty it was there, telling the world about the illegal labor practices, warning the next generation, getting EA in legal trouble, suing the pants off of the managers who are personally responsible-- THAT'S solving the real problem. THAT'S what this is all about. Obviously quitting is on the to-do list for most of EA's employees. You'd know that if you read other people's comments before posting your own. But that's just a place to start. These people aren't whining, they're trying to get organized. They're standing up for themselves. They're telling the Corporate Asshats at EA to FUCK OFF instead of just slinking away and begging for a new job somewhere else while crossing their fingers and hoping it's less shitty.

Talking about injustice isn't whining. Pointing out that other injustices are worse doesn't constitute an intelligent comment. And posting before you read and think makes you a jackass.
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From: (Anonymous)
2004-11-16 11:07 pm (UTC)

Re: To every moron who comes here and says "stop complaining"

Your rant is a whine. "Oh the injustices of the world are all coming down on me...." People should not complain they should act. I don't feel the least bit sorry for this person but I do for you. You are the type that is never at fault it is always someone else. Oh poor you.
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From: (Anonymous)
2004-11-16 11:43 pm (UTC)
Wow. Great read!
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From: (Anonymous)
2004-11-16 11:59 pm (UTC)

Can I ask the original poster an honest question?

And can you give me an honest answer?

You say you guys have to crunch from 9 AM to 10 PM, 7 days a week, 90hrs/week, etc.

Can you tell me honestly, out of those 90 hours, how many of it is spent in:

Actual coding/debugging?

Surfing the web?

Checking your stocks?

Checking your fantasy sports teams?

Reading Drudgereport?

Reading/posting on message boards, like this one?

Taking 1.5-2 hour lunch breaks?

Coffee breaks?

"Doom 3 breaks" or "Halo 2 breaks"??

A quick run to Fry's or Best Buy?

Or just sitting around, chatting and whining with other co-workers about how much you're overworked?

(Reply) (Thread)
From: ea_spouse
2004-11-17 12:18 am (UTC)

Re: Can I ask the original poster an honest question?

For my SO in particular? None. If he so much as reads slashdot during a build process he feels guilty. He works himself extremely hard. I have sat there with him and watched him work, and not for a short period of time -- he does not surf, he does not screw around. Where others are getting the impression that if you have to work these hours you're not using your time effectively I have no idea. This is true from a management point of view (there is waste and redone work and lackadaisical behavior), but the actual engineers on this team pushes EXTREMELY hard. There are people who screw around, but they get canned, quickly, and I obviously take no issue with that. They also do not 'whine' to their coworkers.

The number of assumptions folk are willing to make on behalf of my SO and his coworkers staggers me. It really, honestly does. The case for corporate abuse here is so strong that it makes me question basic humanity that anyone could argue with it. I realize that those who do so are some combination of stupid or not reading the article, but my points are fairly simple; perhaps I was just too lengthy about it.

The only 'breaks' being taken on this project for the majority of the team, that I have seen, actually stood in that office and watched them do what they do, are taken when the management requires the entire team to be there when they have no tasks assigned to them. They do this frequently. They will not release employees to go home and remain on call, and as a result you have a huge number of people toward the end of a project sitting around with nothing to do. I have watched these people. When they have nothing to do, they do MORE WORK. Until there is no more work to do. They voluntarily take on other tasks until there is literally nothing left in the queue.

Other teams might be different, but I will go to bat for this team anytime anywhere. They are by and large an excellent group of people who in no way deserve the treatment that they're getting.

I'm rather tired at the moment, but I will be putting together a FAQ with answers to common questions/comments, including this one ("your SO must not be doing his job right"). I do, however, have a collective answer for the commenters here who have either deliberately or accidentally ignored arrant answers to their concerns, and chosen to think the worst of not just EA employees as a group but my SO and his teammates in particular: RTFA, and swallow your assumptions sideways, they will greater benefit the world in that configuration. And for those foolish enough to want his job after all of this, you can apply at EA.com. Tell them I sent you.
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(no subject) - (Anonymous) Expand
From: (Anonymous)
2004-11-17 12:07 am (UTC)

Can I ask the original poster an honest question?

And can you give me an honest answer?

You say you guys have to crunch from 9 AM to 10 PM, 7 days a week, 90hrs/week, etc.

Can you tell me honestly, out of those 90 hours, how many of it is spent in:

Actual coding/debugging?

Surfing the web?

Checking your stocks?

Checking your fantasy sports teams?

Reading Drudgereport?

Reading/posting on message boards, like this one?

Taking 1.5-2 hour lunch breaks?

Coffee breaks?

"Doom 3 breaks" or "Halo 2 breaks"??

A quick run to Fry's or Best Buy?

Hitting on the secretaries or cute artists?

Or just sitting around, chatting and whining with other co-workers about how much you're overworked?

(Reply) (Thread)
From: (Anonymous)
2004-11-17 12:49 am (UTC)

Non-Trolls, please read...

To all the posters who are offering serious, valid comments, encouraging words, personal stories, and constructive suggestions, I encourage you to just ignore the morons who post "stop whining" "quit and get a new job" and "you are lazy" threads.

These people are Trolls. I know it almost seems like they really beleive the nonsense the type but beleive me, all they want to do is get a rise out of you. Look, its working!

I encourage you to read this page as it eloquently explains who these people are and how to defeat them. http://members.aol.com/intwg/trolls.htm

The only way...THE ONLY WAY to get rid of them and their ridiculous blather is to ignore them.

Now, back to the matter at hand. This is the very beginning of something bigger and better. An organized effort to create more hospitibal work environments in our field. Keep it alive and dont let the trolls derail you!
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From: ravidrath
2004-11-17 12:49 am (UTC)

IGDA Responds...

I'm saddened to see the influx of trolls, but at least some people are working are responding positively.

http://www.igda.org/qol/open_letter.php

Personally, I think that's a good letter and agree with most of the sentiments in there. Because of that, I joined the IGDA (full, paid membership and everything) and volunteered to help on the Quality of Life issue.

They have a lot of sane opinions and some reasonable clout with companies, and are working to get a Quality of Life program put into place - with this they would rate companies and give out a seal of approval of some kind that people would look for when applying to a company, which I think is a great idea.

Anyone seriously interesting in furthering game industry advocacy should join, I believe - people like the IGDA, I believe, will help us work towards solutions that don't involve unionization or future lawsuits.

-Peter
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From: (Anonymous)
2004-11-17 02:15 am (UTC)

Re: IGDA Responds...

"...with this they would rate companies and give out a seal of approval of some kind that people would look for when applying to a company, which I think is a great idea..."

I think this is a great idea, one of the best I've heard.

My one worry with this is that it won't stay honest, that it will be driven by corporate sponsors eventually. The only reason I say this is because someone posted here a few days ago, saying he was a game developer from England who had started a small union over there, but when he tried to sponsor an IGDA meetup, IGDA turned him down and said that their other sponsors didn't like it.

Taking what this poster said at face value, and recognizing that I don't know much about the IGDA, do you think this is a danger? If IGDA meetups can be influenced by their sponsors, why not something like a Quality of Life seal of approval?
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From: (Anonymous)
2004-11-17 01:23 am (UTC)

Wow.

Your writing was powerful. Personally, I hope someone high up from EA read this and took it to heart. That is CRAP what they are doing to their employees, and I even feel a bit ashamed that I recently purchased a game from them.

You probably should write in anonymously with this to the CEO.
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From: (Anonymous)
2004-11-17 01:38 am (UTC)

You obviously don't want a job.....

To the student that posted this message.... You are attempting occupational suicide. You should really get out there and WORK for a living. Any, if not most, of the big studios or companies will require you to work more than your 40 hours in a "crunch-time" situation. Companies are usually upfront about your benefits... If you don't like the terms then don't take the job. You are fooling yourself to think that posts like this are going to "change" anything. All you are going to do is black-list yourself and create a bad image for Ringling. The pros know how the industry is and what is expected of them... don't show your ignorance by believing this mess. You don't know how or why this letter was written... maybe the spouse wasn't willing to support their partner and was lashing out at the company... You never know... I would apologize to EA and comment that next time you will do some research and fact finding before blasting and smearing a company because of something that you read somewhere.

RZ
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From: (Anonymous)
2004-11-17 04:34 am (UTC)

Re: You obviously don't want a job.....

You are still in school, I guess.

"The pros know how the industry is and what is expected of them..."
That's right, and we are the pros. Have you noticed which people are criticizing this blog? Those who don't do what we do. Those not professional enough to get these jobs. I saw one guy say he would give his left nut to work at EA. BS, anyone with half that resolve would be there already if he wanted to.

I know what drives this industry, Two things. When I got into this business I thought the goal of managers and owners was to make the most money possible. Logical, right?
Very naive of me. Number one is ego, number two is money. Most people who seek a position of power get an ego boost by looking down on the "inferiors" who do the work. If you have to respect an inferior to make money, it isn't worth it. Don't believe me? Look around you again.

You are also poorly informed: most game companies are not upfront about benefits and hours - benefits are exaggerated, crunch time is supposedly "avoided except as a last resort". Right.
Your fellow student is wising up fast - good for him, he'll probably do well for himself.
You, on the other hand, sound like a sheep praising the wolves. You'll make someone rich.

Leo
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From: (Anonymous)
2004-11-17 02:11 am (UTC)

it's an old story

When I worked for Sony Pictures Imageworks in 1994, they had us doing the same bullshit. They brought in cots so we could get some sleep, etc. We went to the labor board and threatened to join existing unions. We mutinied en mass and Sony was forced to go to an overtime policy. Having to pay for the extra time, our schedules immeasurably improved. After we came to an agreement with them, they were negotiating salaries that expected a 10 hour work day (5 days per week) which included 2 overtime hours. They used this to their advantage when production was slow and sent people home after 8 hours and this resulted in a 28% pay cut for these days. Some people complained about that but only the people that didn't have any families or social life to speak of. If you get everyone together and in agreement that this slavery has to stop, you CAN do something about it. And it is illegal. I'm not familiar with the bill you talk about but in 1994 anyway, an exempt employee in the state of California had to have control of his/her own work hours and could not be told to report at a specific time for specific hours. This of course was not the case and therefore Sony's actions were illegal.
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From: (Anonymous)
2004-11-17 03:16 am (UTC)

The taint spreads...

The problem is that the managers who learn at EA go everywhere and spread their poor management skills into other companies. I work for a company who recently hired a former EA manager. He immediately started bringing in other EA managers he knew. He treats people like crap, plays favorites, creates more fires than he puts out, and bitches out people even as they're putting in long hours to put out a game.

They talk about how bad it was at EA, but they're no better. Same shit...different company.
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From: (Anonymous)
2004-11-17 04:33 am (UTC)

Care to Name Names?

It may take some courage, but it's the only way to bring change to video game development practices.
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